Frank Leder Aprons

Hailing from an old army surplus, this finely woven fabric was meant to be used as bedsheets in the late sixties, early seventies. Why they never fulfilled their original destiny? Because, Frank Leder tells us, World War III never happened. And so this wonderful cotton blend was left to gather dust in storage. It’s just as well that Frank came along and decided to breathe new life into these old darlings. The idea? Using excellent craftsmanship to update a similarly well-crafted item, saving resources and preventing waste. Frank has named their stunning colour “Baltic Blue” after the Baltic Sea; the aprons are hand-printed in Berlin with an illustration courtesy of Veronika von Manz. The printing technique used on our textiles is called discharge printing. Rather than printing something onto the fabric, it reveals the fabric’s original colour. The advantage is that you can wash your textiles as often as you want – nothing’s going to start peeling off. 

Photos from Marco Seifert
Models: Juliane Kayser / Malik Mangapple

One apron

39,00 

€ 39 per apron

About Frank Leder

If there is one designer who brings German tradition into his work without dabbling in odiously naive notions of “Heimat”,  it’s Frank Leder. In terms of aesthetics and production, his collections are firmly indebted to the legacy of German craftsmanship, reimagining guild clothing and traditional folk costumes.The bulk of Frank’s sales happen in Japan and frankly, we think it’s a scandal that there is as yet not one German fashion store selling his stunning attire.

His cosmetics, too, are full of subtle references and Frank’s trademark wit. His fragrances may sound unusual, but are thoroughly joyful – don’t be surprised if even a hand soap named after long begone butcher’s products leaves you wanting more!